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Repo Man Shot Dead During Repossession

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  • wsands
    started a topic Repo Man Shot Dead During Repossession

    Repo Man Shot Dead During Repossession

    JJ_montroMarshall, VA – June 10, 2014 – A 23-year-old tow truck driver from Maryland was shot and killed attempting to repossess a 10 year old pick-up truck last Thursday.

    Police released the name of the victim Monday morning. Junior Jordan Montero of Hyattsville, Maryland died of a gunshot wound just after midnight Thursday on Conde Road in northern Fauquier County, Virginia. 53 year old Carroll Edward Gregg Jr., faces a second-degree murder charge.
    Gregg called the shooting “an accident” when sheriff’s Sgt. Darrell Shores reached the scene, according to arrest documents.

    A neighbor called 9-1-1 at 12:10 a.m. reporting “that she heard gunshots and saw a tow truck drive into the ditch,” Detective Brandon M. Lillard wrote in his report. Arriving officer Sgt. Shores found “a black tow truck and a dark colored truck down an embankment.” The deputy soon encountered Mr. Gregg and asked what happened. According to a document which provides this account, Mr. Gregg responded, “Just an accident,”

    The responding officer asked Mr. Gregg if he drove the tow truck.

    montro_shtng_scneNo, he replied, pointing to the other vehicle, his 2004 GMC Sierra pickup truck.

    The deputy asked about the tow truck driver. “Mr. Gregg pointed to the tow truck and said, ‘He’s in there dead’,” Detective Lillard wrote.

    “I shot him,” the defendant allegedly said. “I shot, fell and shot again. It was an accident.” ce_gregg_mntro

    Mr. Gregg also told Sgt. Shores that repossessions shouldn’t be allowed “in the middle of the night.”

    Mr. Montero worked for a Chantilly towing company called to repossess the vehicle, according to sheriff’s report.

    Appearing briefly by video in Fauquier County General District Court on Friday, Mr. Gregg applied for a court-appointed attorney. Listing his occupation as “laborer,” the defendant said he could not afford to hire legal representation.

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  • bigdaddy
    replied
    Wot up double A! Is Realty track a paid service and how do you use it in the repossession world?

    Originally posted by assetadjusters View Post
    All this vetting, compliance, bonds, associations, seminars and ridicilous amounts of GL now demanded.

    Has a lender asked for driver qualifications before insuring. Or are they simply intereated in driving records.

    Heres another question.

    Has an insurance company ever asked if the driver was trained----and refused to insure. IMO, Repos are not something to be tackled by a rookie.

    This kid should have never been turned loose by himself.

    Realty track shows 10038 Conde Rd ---pre forclorusre. Asking price 386k. Cops reaponded to a call at the 10000 block of Conde.

    Next door neighbor has home listed for a million.

    Leave a comment:


  • jclark
    replied
    Originally posted by assetadjusters View Post
    All this vetting, compliance, bonds, associations, seminars and ridicilous amounts of GL now demanded.

    Has a lender asked for driver qualifications before insuring. Or are they simply intereated in driving records.

    Heres another question.

    Has an insurance company ever asked if the driver was trained----and refused to insure. IMO, Repos are not something to be tackled by a rookie.

    This kid should have never been turned loose by himself.

    Realty track shows 10038 Conde Rd ---pre forclorusre. Asking price 386k. Cops reaponded to a call at the 10000 block of Conde.

    Next door neighbor has home listed for a million.
    RSIG is requiring all employees to take the CRA course within a reasonable time after joining also now on the table we are looking at requiring all drivers take the National Safety Defensive Driving course. Education and training is about all you can do, yet in some instances this unfortunately will not some of these shootings that happen but if it saves one life then it was well worth the efforts. The total cost of both of these if you are a member is about $200.00.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luxor79
    replied
    The only mistake that is an absolute known is that the repossession was not on DVR.

    The Agent could have done everything correct and still been executed by sniper while leaving the property.

    Unfortunately, I did not read anything that went into detail. Was the truck hooked and leaving with the unit; had the Agent pulled into the driveway, seen the unit blocked and was leaving; was the alarm set off by the Agent prepping the unit to tow, the debtor came out and instructed the Agent to leave and then shot him as leaving?

    Too many unknowns. A DVR on the Agent or the truck would answer some or all of these questions.

    If I missed something in one of the articles, please point it out.

    Leave a comment:


  • assetadjusters
    replied
    All this vetting, compliance, bonds, associations, seminars and ridicilous amounts of GL now demanded.

    Has a lender asked for driver qualifications before insuring. Or are they simply intereated in driving records.

    Heres another question.

    Has an insurance company ever asked if the driver was trained----and refused to insure. IMO, Repos are not something to be tackled by a rookie.

    This kid should have never been turned loose by himself.

    Realty track shows 10038 Conde Rd ---pre forclorusre. Asking price 386k. Cops reaponded to a call at the 10000 block of Conde.

    Next door neighbor has home listed for a million.

    Leave a comment:


  • jclark
    replied
    I read these shootings over and over again to try to find what common denominator would link them together, and how to bring about something from them to help save a life. This young man had his whole life in front of him and was taken from him by a man who may have been a good individual who made a critical mistake.
    One thing that does stick out is many of these shootings involve tow truck drivers from a towing company. Mr. Sanchez (God rest his soul, and prayers for his new family) was on his first repo, how much training and what was the training given him before he hit the field? Is it possible he had little or no training of any substance? It is something we will never know, but could it have been avoided with proper training? Maybe not, however their are a few you can say it was a result to little or no training.
    Those who care about these men and women enough to see they get the best training and education prior to sending them into the field when something happens can at least say I did the best I could to see they were ready. But when it happens they will still wonder if they could have done something else to save their life or injury.
    Bottom line is I wish some body of legal authority could fine the lender who assigns recovery business to people/companies who are not professional enough to document and provide adequate training in every aspect of a professional recovery agent including drivers training.
    I ask everyday that God watch over the men and women in this industry who are trying so hard to make a living, feed their families, and provide a good home for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • anonymous
    replied
    26-year sentence for killing repo man

    http://www.fauquiernow.com/index.php...-repo-man-2015

    The Marshall man who shot and killed a tow truck driver last summer received a 26-year prison sentence Monday morning.

    Carroll Edward “Tootie” Gregg Jr., 53, will spend 20 years behind bars. Judge Herman A. Whisenant Jr. suspended six years of Mr. Gregg’s sentence.

    After three days of testimony, a jury in September found Mr. Gregg guilty of involuntary manslaughter and use of firearm to commit a felony in the death of Junior Jordan Montero Sanchez, 23, just after midnight Friday, June 6, 2014.

    Mr. Sanchez and another driver had come to repossess Mr. Gregg’s pickup truck for delinquent payments on a vehicle title loan.

    The jury rejected a potential murder conviction, which the prosecution sought.

    Jurors recommended the maximum, 10-year sentences on both felony convictions. Judge Whisenant exercised a state code provision that allowed him to add three years on each conviction.

    Defense lawyer Blair Howard called seven witnesses Monday to bolster his argument for a shorter prison term.

    Retired Air Force General Charles G. Boyd and Washington Post reporter Karen DeYoung testified that Mr. Gregg helped maintain their northern Fauquier properties, earned their unequivocal trust and never displayed any hint of anger or violence.

    Former Fauquier sheriff’s deputy and Fredericksburg police officer Susan Clem similarly described the defendant as a positive influence in her life. She has known him since her days as a junior high school softball pitcher, Ms. Clem said.

    “I’ve dealt with a lot of bad people in my life,” she said. “And, he is not one of them. He made a mistake, yes, but he is not a bad person.”

    Robin Gregg Wilds, his sister, said: “It’s not in his character to harm somebody.”

    After their father’s cancer diagnosis in 2013, Mr. Gregg took great care of his parents, visiting daily, shopping and preparing meals for them, Ms. Wilds testified.

    “Words cannot express my remorse,” Mr. Gregg said just before Judge Whisenant pronounced the sentence. “I have replayed the accident in my head over and over . . . .

    “I never meant to try to bring harm of this magnitude to anyone. I take full responsibility,” said Mr. Gregg, who did not testify during his trial.

    Earlier, Commonwealth’s Attorney James P. Fisher argued for the maximum sentence. Of testimony about Mr. Gregg’s positive influence on people, Mr. Fisher noted that the victim won’t have the same opportunities.

    Mr. Sanchez hoped to become a police officer, the prosecutor said.

    The victim, recently married and the father of a young stepson, worked as a security guard and had just taken a second job with a Chantilly towing company. Mr. Sanchez lost his life on his first night as “repo man.”

    After his pickup’s alarm sounded, Mr. Gregg ran from his garage apartment and fired the fatal shot from a hunting rifle.

    The trial included conflicting testimony and evidence about whether Mr. Gregg’s gun fired once or twice and about his position at that moment.

    Mr. Sanchez died in the cab of his tow truck at 10038 Conde Road. He had pulled away from the garage and traveled down a long driveway to the state road.


    Leave a comment:


  • JTDAMiami
    replied

    Junior Jordan Montero Sanchez, 23, died of a rifle shot to his torso — piercing his heart and a lung — early the morning of June 6, 2014, as he pulled onto Conde Road from the driveway to Mr. Gregg’s apartment. New to the job, Mr. Sanchez that night for the first time drove the tow truck on a vehicle repossession.

    Leave a comment:


  • JTDAMiami
    replied
    Jury finds Gregg guilty of involuntary manslaughter

    September 25, 2015

    http://www.fauquiernow.com/index.php...nd-charge-2015

    The jury Friday afternoon found Carroll E. “Tootie” Gregg Jr. guilty of involuntary manslaughter after 9-1/2 hours of deliberation.

    Mr. Gregg, 54, faced potential conviction of first-degree murder in the June 2014 shooting of Junior Jordan Montero Sanchez, who repossessed his pickup truck.

    The jury also found Mr. Gregg guilty of shooting into an occupied vehicle.

    After further deliberation Friday afternoon, the jury recommended the maximum, 10-year sentences on each conviction.

    Leave a comment:


  • JTDAMiami
    replied
    when Gregg came out of his home shooting
    Anynoe who comes out of the home shooting should be charged with first degree, not second degree murder.

    If you and your family are inside the home, safe, and not under any danger of physical harm then there is no reason why you should even come out of the home, shooting.....

    You should be on the phone calling 911 and giving police a description of what is going on....



    When questioned, Gregg allegedly said "I shot him. . . I shot, fell and then shot again, it was an accident."
    How can shooting him twice ever be considered an accident?

    Pointing a firearm and having your finger on the trigger is no accident... it is an intentional action.

    Leave a comment:


  • anonymous
    replied
    Trial to Begin for Man Accused of Killing Repo Man

    Trial to Begin for Man Accused of Killing Repo Man

    http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/lo...328482921.html

    The man accused of killing a repo man in Fauquier County last summer will go on trial Monday.

    Carroll Gregg is facing a second-degree murder charge in the shooting death of 23-year-old Junior Jordan Montero.

    Last June, Montero was trying to repossess Gregg 's 10-year-old pickup truck when Gregg came out of his home shooting, authorities said. The tow truck and pickup truck ended up in a water-filled ditch. Divers tried to rescue Montero, but there was nothing they could do to save him.

    When a sheriff's sergeant reached the scene, Gregg pointed to the ditch and said, "He's in there dead," according to arrest documents.

    "I shot him," Gregg allegedly said. "I shot, fell and shot again. It was an accident."

    Montero had recently taken the job to save money for a wedding ring for his wife.

    Jury selection for Gregg's trial will begin Monday morning. The trial is expected to start at noon.

    Leave a comment:


  • anonymous
    replied
    Motions filed for alleged July repo murder in Marshall

    Motions filed for alleged July repo murder in Marshall

    http://www.fauquier.com/news/article...r_in_marshall/

    Carroll Gregg Jr., who is accused of murdering a man repossessing his 2004 GMC truck on July 6, filed two motions Jan. 20, a month before his four-day trial is set to begin.

    At 1 a.m. on June 6, Junior Jordan Montero, 23, and another man, Alex Martin, arrived at Gregg's apartment at 10038 Conde Road, Marshall to repossess his truck, which he had purchased with a loan from CashPoint on August 30, 2013, according to court documents.

    The two men arrived in separate cars: Montero in the tow truck and Martin in a truck the two had repossessed earlier that evening.

    While trying to break into the truck, Martin set off the car alarm, waking Gregg, who proceeded to tell the two men to "get the f--k out of here."

    According to the court records, Martin and Montero did not identify themselves and did not tell Gregg why they were taking his truck.

    The two ignored Gregg, hooked the truck up to the tow truck and proceeded to drive away.

    During the bond hearing on July 7, the Commonwealth's Attorney James Fisher said it was while the men were leaving the property that Montero was killed with a "high-powered rifle."

    Gregg does not deny that he fired a gun during the incident, but claims that he fired it on accident, according to court records.

    According to a search warrant filed in Fauquier County Circuit Court, deputies went to the 10000 block of Conde Road on June 6 after a neighbor heard gun shots and saw a tow truck drive into a ditch. Authorities found Montero dead in the cab of the truck.

    When questioned, Gregg allegedly said "I shot him. . . I shot, fell and then shot again, it was an accident."

    According to court records, Gregg didn't pay the loan company in April, partially paid in May and then again partially paid in June. On May 5, the repossession order was filed and L and K Recovery, where Montero and Martin worked, was hired.

    Court records reveal that Gregg's truck had been repossessed twice before in 2011 and 2012.

    Breach of Peace

    One of the motions Gregg filed asked that he be allowed to present new evidence during the trial to prove that the repossession was in fact a breach of peace and that the two men should not have continued to take the truck.

    The motion cites Wallace vs. Chrysler Credit Corp. in that if a "debtor is present and makes objection, a breach of peace analysis comes to the fore and the creditors must desist."

    The defense argues that breaking into the truck qualifies as breach of peace.

    "The CashPoint agents should have immediately desisted any further attempt at repossessing [the truck] and left the property, which would have required CashPoint to have resorted to the appropriate legal process to enforce their rights with repossessing the truck," according to the motion.

    The motion hearing was set for Feb. 3 at 9 a.m.

    Gun powder residue

    Gregg's second motion had a more immediate effect after an emergency hearing was called to address it.

    Following the July 6 incident, Gregg's hands and cheeks were tested for gun powder residue, however, the Department for Forensic Science does not test the samples from the face once it's determined that there was residue on the hands, according to the court documents.

    Gregg did not argue that he fired his gun, however, he remains firm that he accidentally fired it.

    "The defendant contends that he fells in a hole on his property while running with a rifle and that the rifle accidentally discharged as he was falling forward," according to court documents.

    Gregg wants the samples taken from his cheeks to be tested because there would be no traces of gun powder residue on his cheeks, proving he fell while the gun was fired.

    The Commonwealth's Attorney's office agreed that the information may be relevant, according to court documents.

    The motion was approved Jan. 20.

    Leave a comment:


  • j2huggies
    replied
    I have an entire territory, mostly back country, to myself, and I have only been at this about a week, a previous poster was right, no experience could ever stop a bullet

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  • jclark
    replied
    I pray for this man and his family, as I do for all those injured or killed that are repossessors.
    Two statements made above are both correct, education can help in any situation, however once a bullet is fired with good aim or just luck it's to late for education.
    My grief for these men and women who are injured or even killed turns to anger, not so much for the perpetrator as the courts will hopefully see justice is done, but anger at the lender/forwarder who sent the account. Did they pay a fair price, did they pay a close fee, and do they treat this person with respect and genuine appreciation for the job he does. We all face the same out come as Jordan every time we go to the field, I pray for all that their day will a safe one and the lenders will realize what we do.

    Leave a comment:


  • basscat
    replied
    Praying for peace and comfort for this young man's family and friends. What a tragic loss, may his family get the justice deserved. The defendant will most likely get life without parole. He will wake up every day from now on knowing the pain he has caused to both families. Maybe just maybe something good will come from this. May God put his hand of comfort and mercy over this.

    Leave a comment:

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